Aspinwall Portrait

“Aspinwall” original painting by Carol Skinger  24″ x 31″

“Aspinwall” original painting by Carol Skinger, is a watercolor, gouache & ink painting on 400 lb watercolor paper. It is $950 framed and is in my solo art show and for sale at Cooper Siegel Community Library   in Fox Chapel, PA May 14, 2017- March 15, 2018. 25% of each sale benefits the library.

Prints available 11″ x 14″ printed on watercolor paper $50. Larger prints 16 x 20 available as well. A high resolution scan has been made for future reproduction uses which can be generated (larger prints and other uses).

Where Brilliant Railroad Bridge meets Aspinwall is the beautiful new Aspinwall Riverfront Park which recently received  some awards. Art critic Mary Thomas reports the awards in Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Architect Eric Fisher won the AIA People’s Choice Award for his design re-purposing the  Aspinwall Marina.  AIA awarded this project  a Certificate of Merit in Historic Preservation.

Details of my painting are seen below.

Detail from my full size painting “Aspinwall”

At left the chateaux style yellow brick building is on Maple Avenue in Aspinwall, PA. It  is a former convent of Saint Scholastica Church in Aspinwall built in 1925. Very near is Christ the Divine Teacher Catholic Academy (formerly called St. Scholastica School), and Saint Scholastica Church. The architect  of the former convent Edward J. Weber was a native of Cincinnati who studied architecture at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris and traveled throughout Europe. He came to practice in Pittsburgh, where he had a number of Roman Catholic commissions, of which this convent was one. Weber clearly loved the medieval period, even writing in 1927 that this was when, “art was at its best.” In this convent, he seems to have been inspired by the 15th century Château du Moulin in the Loire valley, which clearly was the inspiration for Central Catholic High School in Oakland. Information  on the architect thanks to historian Frank Kurtik, Docent at Heinz Memorial Chapel and a former Heinz family archivist.

Detail from my full size painting “Aspinwall”

The red brick church to the right sitting more or less in the center of Aspinwall  is the  Aspinwall Presbyterian Church. Everything but the church’s tower burned down in 1999 and was rebuilt immediately. The Sanctuary a KSBA design, has a wood-beamed ceiling and interior cross plan. The Sanctuary, built in 2000, has a wide center aisle and holds a 40 pipe Luley  organ.  Four large Hunt Studio designed stained glass circular windows illuminate the Sanctuary.

Brilliant Railroad Bridge a truss bridge spanning the Allegheny River beyond, was built in 1904 by the Pennsylvania Railroad as part of a bypass of the narrow tracks around Downtown Pittsburgh. It connects Aspinwall with Highland Park. On the Aspinwall side it lands at the  Aspinwall Riverfront Park.

D.J. Bryant, a designer at AE7 Planners and Architects, proposed a bike and pedestrian use for the Brilliant Railroad Bridge  an ambitious new idea—the Brilliant Branch Rail-to-Trail—in a July 2017 Next Pittsburgh article.  It would increase connectivity and access to safe, affordable transportation options for several communities in the city. I hope this becomes a reality. Open link for exciting renderings. The rail line has been out of use since the Azcon Metals scrapyard on the outskirts of Aspinwall ceased functions around 2010.

An ongoing discussion of road access to a future Riverfront 47 development has activated public involvement and interest and is under discussion.  To clarify things the folks at Aspinwall Riverfront Park created this statement.

Hydroelectric power could be fueling the homes and businesses being developed in the Riverfront 47 project along the Allegheny River in Aspinwall and Sharpsburg by 2020.

The current issues in December 2017 are a new PennDot proposal and gathering public input around entrance and exit isPennDot prosues between Highland Park Bridge and  Route 28.

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